HN Books @HNBooksMonth

The best books of Hacker News.

Hacker News Comments on
Masterminds of Programming: Conversations with the Creators of Major Programming Languages (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly))

Federico Biancuzzi, Shane Warden · 6 HN comments
HN Books has aggregated all Hacker News stories and comments that mention "Masterminds of Programming: Conversations with the Creators of Major Programming Languages (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly))" by Federico Biancuzzi, Shane Warden.
View on Amazon [↗]
HN Books may receive an affiliate commission when you make purchases on sites after clicking through links on this page.
Amazon Summary
Masterminds of Programming features exclusive interviews with the creators of several historic and highly influential programming languages. In this unique collection, you'll learn about the processes that led to specific design decisions, including the goals they had in mind, the trade-offs they had to make, and how their experiences have left an impact on programming today. Masterminds of Programming includes individual interviews with: Adin D. Falkoff: APL Thomas E. Kurtz: BASIC Charles H. Moore: FORTH Robin Milner: ML Donald D. Chamberlin: SQL Alfred Aho, Peter Weinberger, and Brian Kernighan: AWK Charles Geschke and John Warnock: PostScript Bjarne Stroustrup: C++ Bertrand Meyer: Eiffel Brad Cox and Tom Love: Objective-C Larry Wall: Perl Simon Peyton Jones, Paul Hudak, Philip Wadler, and John Hughes: Haskell Guido van Rossum: Python Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo and Roberto Ierusalimschy: Lua James Gosling: Java Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson, and James Rumbaugh: UML Anders Hejlsberg: Delphi inventor and lead developer of C# If you're interested in the people whose vision and hard work helped shape the computer industry, you'll find Masterminds of Programming fascinating.
HN Books Rankings

Hacker News Stories and Comments

All the comments and stories posted to Hacker News that reference this book.
At Apple? Maybe not. But elsewhere?

Maybe no articles written about them but books or chapters ([0], [1]) written by them.

In the spotlight? You betcha, i think watching talks by Brian Cantrill is highly entertaining. Rich Rickeys' talks are highly regarded on HN (making a mental note to watch them). Carmack talking at Quakecon for hours about many different things.

(edit) formatting and links

[0] https://www.amazon.com/Coders-Work-Reflections-Craft-Program...

[1] https://www.amazon.com/Masterminds-Programming-Conversations...

Uehreka
> At Apple? Maybe not.

Chris Lattner (inventor of LLVM and Swift) was pretty prominent when he was at Apple. He got stage time during at least one keynote and was well known in the macOS/iOS community. Not to mention that their engineering leads in general get to present their work every year to the devs who will be using it during the WWDC sessions.

scns
Glad to be proven wrong! Learned some iOS development years ago but are out of touch what is happening in the appleverse at large, no snark intended.
There's a chapter from Anders on [1].

1: https://www.amazon.com/Masterminds-Programming-Conversations...

Boulth
Right! I remember now buying the book just to read the chapter about Anders. Was not disappointed. (for the record other "masterminds" were also interesting).
A lot of great books are already mentioned.

I also enjoyed "Masterminds of Programming: Conversations With The Creators Of Major Programming Languages" [0]

It's a collection of interviews with creators of languages (FORTH, C++, Python, Haskell, and many more) You learn a lot about language design decisions and their pitfalls.

And a shameless plug: I shared MapFilterFold as a Show HN earlier, a project that collects recommendations from Ask HN threads. Browsing the books tagged computer science might yield some interesting results[1]

[0] https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0596515170/

[1] https://mapfilterfold.com/books/?genre=computer%20science

Hopefully they don't have straight UB do they?

Yes, most languages do, unless they are formally defined (ML is formally defined, but most other languages are not. In this book http://www.amazon.com/Masterminds-Programming-Conversations-... several of the language creators say that fully defining the language formally is not worth the effort).

While not a history book, per se, "Masterminds of Programming: Conversations with the Creators of Major Programming Languages" [1] is a pretty great read. You can get a ton of historical context from reading what the language designers were thinking when they created their languages.

[1] http://www.amazon.com/Masterminds-Programming-Conversations-...

HN Books is an independent project and is not operated by Y Combinator or Amazon.com.
~ [email protected]
;laksdfhjdhksalkfj more things
yahnd.com ~ Privacy Policy ~
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.